Infant Lessons

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Nemos

Adult Participation, 8 child per class limit, 25 minute duration. Age Indication: 6 - 14 Months

Introduction to swimming learning key skills that will aid in development of your child and their swimming skills. Beginner to advanced

Wiggles

Adult Participation, 8 child per class limit, 25 minute duration. Age Indication: 14 - 28 Months

Introduction to swimming learning key skills that will aid in development of your child and their swimming skills. Beginner to advance.

Sprats

Adult Participation, 4 child per class limit, 25 minute duration. Age Indication: 28 - 36 Months

New students to be assessed by Fulton Swim School prior to being booked into this class.

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Their first lessons with a parent/guardian is a time of discovery for your child


Our swimming lessons for babies are always with a parent or guardian present with the baby in the water. This bond is needed to reassure your baby and introduce them gently to the experience. Our staff are fully trained to offer parents support and guidance in these early stages with a programme designed to be fun and enjoyable for your baby. Over the first few lessons we will slowly start introducing new experiences for your baby to grow their confidence. Here we explain the first 13 months of their development.

First lesson - from 6 months


At six months old usually baby has control of their head movement. It is still large compared to the rest of the body. They have better control of their arms and legs. When lying on their back they can raise the leg and catch the foot. Rolling over is also becoming voluntary and they will roll from front to back and back to front when they want a change of position.

Babies enjoy social contact and like to be around the parents and others. If talked to by others and smiled at, they smile back and babble away in baby talk. Parents are still the main focus in a baby's world and enjoy contact with Mum and Dad best and may become upset when handed to the teacher. In the first set of lessons there is minimal contact with the teacher so baby gets comfortable with us.

The head, arms and legs proportion make the child top heavy, which makes floating on the front hard. They maybe able to float on the back but this is an unnatural position and they may want to roll to the prone. When on the back, have the ears right under the water or right out, as half in and half out is uncomfortable as it makes the ears vibrate.

CASE STUDY: Quinn


At six months, Quinn has had this first lesson. He was a little unsettled as he hadn't had his sleep, he was tried, a little unsure with all these people in his bath, and of the teacher. He needed a lot of reassurance from Sarah.

Quinn enjoyed the class if he was kept moving and when chasing a ball around the pool he has very good head control and was catching the ball. He was happy to go on his back if it wasn't for too long. Feet on the bucket go out, bounce back and pick up toys.

/image of a infants
/image of a infants

From 9 Months


Between nine and ten months infants are starting to pull themselves up on furniture and walking around. Most are crawling at this stage and no longer are they content to stay in one place, but like to be where the action is or in the midst of what is going on.

For swimming the righting reflex is strong and they wont like being on their backs however we still need to practice this for water safety reasons. Infants enjoy being on their tummies and will mimic the crawling motion and will swim further.

They have become very good at reading parents thoughts and feelings these should be positive and encouraging as this will help build self confidence.

At ten months Quinn is crawling, pulling himself up on furniture. In the water he is swimming between instructor and Dad with a crawling motion. He is happy on his back when doing rotations and rolling over through the tunnel.

Aged 10 - 12 Months


At this time babies become self confident, this happens as baby is moving around and trying to master the environment without parents help. They will also be starting to leave the separation anxiety stage behind and establishing their own identities. The infant enjoys routine and predictable events as this makes them feel in control which leads to self confidence. It is also very important to provide new and different experiences with lots of fun and positive encouragement.

This is also a time that fear can start happening. The easiest way to instil fear is to push an experience that they are not ready for. Parents and caregivers always need to be happy and positive.

The child’s language skills have improved, they can now understand more words and they are speaking. They enjoy imitating others so are more likely to copy parents and other children in the class.

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